Improvements to AntarcticGlaciers.org

Here at AntarcticGlaciers.org we have been busy making many updates to the website. We are particularly keen to update the website to bring it in to line with the reformed A-Level syllabus, and also to update and rewrite some of the older content, and improve the website as a resource to promote public understanding of glaciers and climate change.

Since AntarcticGlaciers.org was founded 6.5 years ago, we have undergone substantial improvements and learned a lot over the years. This outreach endeavour, motivated by a desire to publicly communicate the risks that climate change and rising sea levels pose to our world’s glaciers and ice sheets, has evolved into one of the premier sites on this subject. This website aims to inspire both interested adults and also young people and school children with geology and geomorphology, and specifically targets teachers to supply them with engaging, original content that they can use in lesson planning.

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The Role of Scientists as Communicators: From the Classroom to the Pub

Do you consider yourself a science communicator? Does your research group participate in public outreach? Do you have creative ways to engage non-technical audiences in your research? Have you ever evaluated your education and outreach efforts? If so, we invite you to share with us during an informative session titled The Role of Scientists as Communicators: From the Classroom to the Pub (ED038) at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in December. Continue reading

Are websites and blogs an effective outreach tool for academics?

Introduction | The science of science communication | Outlets for science communication | Online science communication | Are blogs effective methods of science communication? | Summary | References |

Introduction

There is a movement afoot. Academics and scientists are entering the blogosphere, and their numbers are increasing 1,2. The majority are early career scientists – PhD students and post-docs, like me 3. I have already written about the benefits of blogging to early-career researchers, but here I explore blogging as an outreach tool in a little more depth. Continue reading